Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug
Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug
Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug
Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug
Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug
Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug
Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug
Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug
Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug

Multi Size Gray, Beige Hand Knotted Tibetan Wool/Bamboo Silk Modern & Contemporary Oriental Area Rug

Oriental Rug Of Houston

Regular price $ 4,669.20 $ 1,384.00 Sale

Frequently Bought Together

  • Multi Sizes Loombloom Dual Surface Felt & Rubber Non-Slip Backing Rug Pad

This is a beautiful Gray, Beige, Blue Color Hand Knotted LoomBloom Tibetan Wool Rug from India. The rug is designer art for your floors! Its High Low pile creates interesting visual intrigue and adds instant drama and glamour to its surroundings. Even the color palette is extremely soothing! It works towards creating a harmony within disparate decor elements of home interiors. The overall impression is one of technique and craft coinciding as an art form-of timeless elegance and aesthetics.

  • Exact Size: Multiple Size Available
  • Weave: Hand Knotted Rug
  • Yarn: Wool/Bamboo Silk
  • Color: Gray, Beige, Blue, Multi
  • Origin: India
  • Pile Height: 0.5 inch
  • Condition: New with tag
  • Rug#: ORH18143

 

Story Behind the Art: For centuries Tibetans have used rugs for decorative and functional purposes, drawing upon geometric patterns, auspicious symbols, real and mythical animals, and natural imagery to create beautiful, colorful designs. But it was only after 1959 with the Chinese invasion of Tibet and the growth of Tibetan diaspora in Nepal and Tibet that Tibetan rug weaving underwent a crucial commercial revival. In the 1970s, Tibetan rugs rose to prominence and Nepalese artisans, who were drafted in to keep up with the rising demand, became the mainstay of the Tibetan rug weaving traditions. Tibetan rug utilizes a slit-loop technique called the Tibetan knot which makes for a pile that is a wonderful mix of depth, texture and richness. In modern times, designs featured in Tibetan, Nepalese rugs (those woven by Tibetan refugees in Nepal) and Indo-Tibetans (woven in India) range from Westernized adaptations of traditional Tibetan motifs (such as branching floral designs and snow lions) to a large mixture of foreign and modern free-form patterns.